Upcoming Mad Moose Running Events 2017

Premier Running Events in Utah and Colorado

Whether you are looking for your next start line or searching for volunteer opportunities you can’t go wrong with Mad Moose Events. Make a commitment today to be outdoors, explore the trail systems, and grow with the ultra community. Be sure to follow the Moose Herd and their 2017 accomplishments at madmooseevents.com and check out our Facebook page.
Michael Hartley

Challenges Of Long Distance Runs

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What do blisters, muscle cramping, and acid reflux have in common? For me, the Cheyenne Mountain 50 k on April 25th. It was a day, and a race, to endure. I found myself taping blisters and experiencing a burning throat all before 25 k. Somehow I had let myself wear a double layer of socks that insisted on providing blisters and a hydration and fuel plan that offered me heartburn. I was certainly better prepared than that…regardless, we all must experience days with unforeseen challenges and take each challenge in stride. The race was well supported with great volunteers; I just chose to have an off day. I found muscle cramping hiding behind just about every big rock and tree the last 10 kilometers. Yes, I finished, and have learned from my journey. Be careful with things you have been offered and don’t be too curious on what’s behind that next tree or underneath that rock you have overturned. All kidding aside be sure to train, prepare and do practice runs with everything.

One hundred and sixty eight hours or 7 days later it was time for redemption. The Collegiate Peaks 50 mile! The Blisters were healed (almost), the hydration and fuels for energy were in check and my curiosities were subsided. Buena Vista and the Collegiate Peaks trail were under submission and I was in control. The race started smoothly and the weather was ideal. The course was pretty tough with a wide range of terrain and elevation change. I was still in control at mile 15 with no health issues or lingering curiosities to find a cramping rock or tree. Then, at mile 17.9, I had a psychology lesson. During this lesson, 7.1 miles in distance time, I was taught through an inner conscious dialogue about the “1001 reasons to be happy with a 25 mile time and finish” and how that second 25 miles was just not in the cards for today. Well, I am here to tell ya, in ultra running you can be in the best of shape and willing to endure great pain, but if you don’t have Zen in check, it is all over. The mind is a powerful thing. It is worth mentioning that in many distances or any challenge for that matter, your body can get you half way and it’s all Zen after that. Although my training and body was still up for the task, my mind provided me a 25 mile time for Collegiate Peaks this season. No matter what went on during that psychology lesson, my 25 mile finish was decided at 17.9.

Three hundred and sixty hours or 15 days later, with my Zen fully in check, I will toe the line for the tenth annual Colfax marathon in Denver. I look forward to the people and the fun, and maybe even a PR.

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What Is The Perfect Running Shoe?

If you are like me, each week provides several different surfaces to run on; dirt, rock, roots, pavement, gravel and then you add flat, incline, rolling, climbing and then there’s slower miles, speed workouts, walking and hiking.  For each, footwear is vital for getting you from point A to point B.  And, if you are like me, you have a lot of different choices.  What is that old saying? “I have too many pairs of running shoes … Said no runner ever.” So how do you find the “perfect shoe”?
It is likely you all have heard of the wet test for finding your shoe type.  Basically, wet the bottom of your foot and step on a bag or piece of paper:

 wet test (1)

If you have visited a running store or specialty shop it is likely you have seen the treadmill test with video cameras:

treadmill test

 At the same running store or specialty shop you might find a computer gait analysis:

 foot analysis

 These are great tools for learning more about yourself and your feet. Use these tools and make notes of what they tell you, but don’t discount what you already know about your running and your body.  Break out your runner’s log, and track how you feel in current or previous shoes. This log and the daily reminders of how you feel under various conditions will continue to be one of your best tools available for “the next pair”.  In my opinion, it is only you and your experience that can find, feel and continue to monitor the perfect fit in the perfect shoes.
Document, document, document. It is so important to have a reference as to how you feel under different conditions. Make notes about it all; food, sleep, shoes, laces, socks, shorts, shirts, head gear, glasses, pit stops, and the list can go on. This is a priceless tool when it comes to buying your next pair (or three) of shoes or trying to remember what will feel best on race day under the projected conditions.
When it is all said and done there is no single way or right way to find your perfect shoe. Don’t be afraid to have more than one perfect shoe. Using all the available tools, knowing how you train, and understanding that change is inevitable, will keep you on track with healthy feet.
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Preparing For My Upcoming 50K

After watching the eclipse this morning I am gearing up for my last “long run” before tapering for some upcoming races. I will cut my weekly mileage by about 40% each week in preparation for the Cheyenne Mountain 50k on April 25th with the Collegiate Peaks 50 mile in Buena Vista the following weekend. I believe tapering the last two or three weeks before a race is good practice. This can take sincere commitment and discipline due to the fact your body wants to keep training. I have found this taper help me stay injury free and show up fresh at the start line.

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Race Preparation For A Trail Marathon In March

image (1)Yes, it might be thought of as old school, but preparation is key for a
safe and stress free start. Whether you are heading out to the trails
for a hike, or toeing the start line for your next race, being prepared
puts you in shape for a good place in fitness.

For me, the gun goes off in less than twenty four hours and I am
performing my pre-race packing ritual. Salida Run Through Time
marathon is a challenging course with narrow, hilly, single track and
jeep trails with about 4800 feet of climbing. I am told the course has
seen some sunlight the last three days, but snow and mud are still
prevalent course conditions.

Keeping the course and conditions in mind, with a forecast of thirties
and forties during prime race time, I am packing running shorts and two
long sleeve shirts, one light and one heavy. I am a firm believer in leg compression sleeves both on the course and during recovery. I am turning to my Nike Lunar Eclipse shoes for this race as these will perform best if I need to put Yaktrax on for traction, or if I need to quickly shed mud. A pair of Injinji lightweight run toe socks with a
second pair of Smartwool socks is race plan. Even before the socks go on, kinesiology tape will be applied for support and help with ankle rolls (that never happens). And, of course, a rock shedding, heel saving pair of Running Funky gaiters will be in place to keep debris out of the shoes!

Light gloves, 70 oz Camelbak, Gu and Clif Bloks, New Skin chafing spray, tube with ibuprofen, salt tablets, and Rolaids, shades, warm head cap and signature Marathon and Beyond hat with neck flap all are on the list.

There is no perfect list for getting prepared for your outings or events. Find your ritual and continue to rebalance it to your fitness adventure needs.

Again, being prepared for a hike, casual run or race can help keep you safe and smiling in fitness.

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